How to write assertions

How to Write Assertions

November 10, 2016
Assertions are like megaphones. They should clarify and amplify the point you are trying to make. If they are too loud or too soft the point won't get made.

The assertion is one of the most important parts of an essay- especially an argumentative one- so it’s very important that you know how to write them.

The assertion is where you make a claim and/or clearly define the side you want to argue. It's easy to get lost when coming up with assertions. . Here’s a quick guide to help you write perfect assertions for your essay.

Be knowledgeable

Before you start writing your assertions, make sure your facts are straight. Do some research on the subject, and collect any important information that you might need. Remember, every topic has two sides to it. 

Learn what they are, the pros and cons of each, and then compare. Be extra vigilant when looking for sources. There should be a reputable source behind any claim, so that you can be sure they’re accurate.

Back it all up

Your assertions needs to be a stable throughout. One of the best ways to hold up your assertions is to surround them with your research findings. I recommend following the assertion, evidence, commentary rubric. 

An essay asserting that Martin Luther King Jr. was a great man would be true, but unconvincing if you don’t have enough evidence to support it, and commentary to explain yourself? In addition, be careful not to stray too far away from your topic when using evidence. Use your thesis statement as a stabilizing guide while you are writing. 

Be clear and concise

Since each assertion lets you take a stand on your topic, it’s very important that you keep things clear and concise. Don’t beat around the bush. State your claim during the introduction, but don’t elaborate extensively yet. That’s for the latter parts of the essay. There’s also no need to use too many adjectives. Just keep everything short and to the point. Ideally, an assertion is only one sentence long, much like a thesis statement.

Be thematic

Once you’ve written your assertions down, you can proceed with the rest of your essay. You have to keep in mind that your essay’s structure has to be built around the assertions that you made in the first place. This means that most of the things you write afterwards should support and corroborate your assertions, and not contradict them. 

You can present differing evidence, but be sure that they are used as possible counter-arguments, and address them efficiently in your essay.

Other Tools & Resources

Every paid tool comes with a free trial! Check it out!
Automatic APA Formatting
Try it out for Free ⇢
RUNNING HEADER
Title of an APA Paper

An abstract is a single paragraph, without indentation, that summarizes the key points of the manuscript in 150 to 250 words. For simpler papers in Paul Rose’s classes, a somewhat shorter abstract is fine. The purpose of the abstract is to provide the reader with a brief overview of the paper. When in doubt about a rule, check the sixth edition APA style manual rather than relying on this template. (Although I prefer only one space after a period, two spaces after a period are suggested by the sixth­edition APA manual at the top of page 88.) This document has a history that compels me to give credit where it’s due. Many years ago I downloaded a fifth­edition template from an

A+
Complete MLA Format
Try it out for Free ⇢
Header 3Works Cited

 on the outcome of one man's idealistic motives and desires of dabbling with nature, which result in the creation of a horrific creature. Victor Frankenstein is not doomed to failure from his initial desire to overstep the natural bounds of human knowledge. Rather, it is his poor parenting of his progeny that lead to his creation's thirst for the vindication of his unjust life. In his idealism, Victor is blinded, and so the creation accuses him for delivering him into a world where he could not ever be entirely received by the people who inhabits it. Not only failing to foresee his faulty idealism, nearing the end of the tale, he embarks upon a final journey, consciously choosing to pursue his creation in vengeance, while admitting that it may result in his own doom. The creation of an unloved being and the quest for the elixir of life holds Victor Frankenstein more accountable for his own death than the creation himself.

Header 2Works Cited

Although humans have the tendency to set idealistic goals to better future generations, often the results can prove disastrous, even deadly. The tale of Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, focuses on the outcome of one man's idealistic motives and desires of dabbling with nature, which result in the creation of a horrific creature. Victor Frankenstein is not doomed to failure from his initial desire to overstep the natural bounds of human knowledge. Rather, it is his poor parenting of his progeny that lead to his creation's thirst for the vindication of his unjust life. In his idealism, Victor is blinded, and so the creation accuses him for delivering him into a world where he could not ever be entirely received by the people who inhabits it. Not only failing to foresee his faulty idealism, nearing the end of the tale, he embarks upon a final journey, consciously choosing to pursue his creation in vengeance, while admitting that it may result in his own doom. The creation of an unloved being and the quest for the elixir of life holds Victor Frankenstein more accountable for his own death than the creation himself.

Your Name Header 1
Teacher
Class
Due Date
This is the Title

Although humans have the tendency to set idealistic goals to better future generations, often the results can prove disastrous, even deadly. The tale of Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, focuses on the outcome of one man's idealistic motives and desires of dabbling with nature, which result in the creation of a horrific creature. Victor Frankenstein is not doomed to failure from his initial desire to overstep the natural bounds of human knowledge. Rather, it is his poor parenting of his progeny that lead to his creation's thirst for the vindication of his unjust life. In his idealism, Victor is blinded, and so the creation accuses him for delivering him into a world where he could not ever be entirely received by the people who inhabits it. Not only failing to foresee his faulty idealism, nearing the end of the tale, he embarks upon a final journey, consciously choosing to pursue his creation in vengeance, while admitting that it may result in his own doom. The creation of an unloved being and the quest for the elixir of life holds Victor Frankenstein more accountable for his own death than the creation himself.